1. Mastery Charter School Students Intern at Fleisher

    Fleisher was lucky to have Mastery Charter School Students, Mihki and Angelica, intern at Fleisher. The two started working at Fleisher the first week in February and finished at the end of May ( it was a 4 month internship). They gained experience working in our programming department, and visitor services. They also helped out in the teen lounge, youth workshops and assisted the exhibitions coordinator in the galleries. Here’s a few things to know about them!

    Mihki Woods

    Year:10th grade
    Favorite Subject:
    History and Biology
    Goal for the future:
    To attend a renowned 4 year college and have a successful job as a historian.
    Favorite thing about interning at Fleisher:
    I learned how to become more organized and communicate more efficiently.

    Angelica Flores

    Year: 10th grade
    Favorite Subject: Reading and Writing
    Goal for the future: To attend a renowned 4 year college, get my Ph.D, own a business and write a book of short stories and poetry.
    Favorite thing about interning at Fleisher: Working with the kids classes and learning about art.

     

    (Source: fleisher.org)

  2. Come to Fleisher THIS SATURDAY, June 9 for ARTspiration!!
Crafts, Face Paint, Vendors, Food, Art-Making, Sculpture, Pop-up Performances, Music and SO MUCH MORE! :)

    Come to Fleisher THIS SATURDAY, June 9 for ARTspiration!!

    Crafts, Face Paint, Vendors, Food, Art-Making, Sculpture, Pop-up Performances, Music and SO MUCH MORE! :)

  3. “Bella Vista to see ‘Autumn’ anew" - "David Guinn is currently working on designs for a new fall-themed mural, planned for a wall outside Fleisher on the 700 block of Catharine Street.” - Check it out on PLAN PHILLY’s Eyes On The Street Blog!

    Bella Vista to see ‘Autumn’ anew" - "David Guinn is currently working on designs for a new fall-themed mural, planned for a wall outside Fleisher on the 700 block of Catharine Street.” - Check it out on PLAN PHILLY’s Eyes On The Street Blog!

  4. Fleisher Interview with Teaching Artist Michelle Ortiz

    Michelle works as an artist, muralist and educator who uses her art to create social change in communities. As a teaching artist, Michelle has taught a number of courses through Fleisher including  Dibujo Basico, an introductory bi-lingual drawing course specifically intended for Spanish-speaking students.


    1. What is your primary artistic medium? Do you have a favorite style of work?

    My primary artistic medium is painting. Over the past ten years, my artistic practice has combined both studio works in figurative painting, printmaking, drawing, and writing, as well as large scale public murals. It is difficult to say what style of work is my favorite, I am interested in creating artwork that tells a story and reveals compelling images that impact the viewer.

    2. What types of projects have you been working on outside Fleisher?

    I have trained artists in public art and community engagement techniques in different countries. Since 2008, I have created large-scale murals with communities in Fiji, Juarez and Chihuahua City, Mexico and Spain as a Cultural Envoy through the United States Embassy. I have also created murals through independent projects in Costa Rica, Ecuador and Puebla, Mexico. Right now, I am preparing for my next Cultural Envoy artist residency in Buenos Aires, Argentina where I will be working with the community in the creation of a mural utilizing mural and street art techniques.

    In August 2012, I will be leading the “Aqui y Alla” (Here and There) project that explores the impact of immigration in the lives of Mexican immigrant youth in South Philadelphia in connection with youth in Chihuahua, Mexico. This project will work simultaneously on both sides of the border, Chihuahua and Philadelphia to join the two cultural worlds through the vision of young people. Four skilled graffiti/ street artists from the Colectivo Rezizte (Juarez) and Colectivo Madroño (Chihuahua City) will work in collaboration with me by guiding the youth (here and there) in the creation of a collaborative permanent mural in South Philadelphia.

    I also work part-time as the Program Manager at the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation where I continue to develop programs and free workshops to support the professional development of teaching artists in Philadelphia.


    3. Your work seems to include a political edge to it. What inspires this? What do you consider to be the relationship between Art and the politics of social change?

    My early art work started as an investigation of my cultural identity. I created portraits of my family and myself searching for ancestral traces. During this process I realized that I was creating a visual history that reflected my cultural and social experiences within my family. In1999, I began to teach and create murals and mosaics with diverse communities in Philadelphia and New Jersey. I became inspired through the interactions that emerged from conversations with my students and community members and I saw that they were reflections of my family. They all carried with them a lifetime of stories and believed that their realities were unimportant and had no value.

    As a child of immigrants, I grew up with feelings of being ‘other, of belonging and not belonging. I struggled with issues of class and race. I come from a tradition with strong oral histories that were not written down or visually represented, and risk being lost. For these reasons, my work as an artist takes place in communities that share these common experiences. My creative practice involves finding value in the stories and histories of marginalized people; creating powerful images and messages as a vehicle to share these stories; claiming and transforming space in ways that affirm or challenge people’s experiences in that space; and providing the opportunity to create a dialogue through art around the most profound personal or community issues.

    I suppose that my work can be viewed as a political statement, but that is not the primary intention of my work. I want to represent and honor the people that create the spirit of the space that they inhabit, reveal their faces and keep alive their stories through my images.

     

    4. Your performance collective Las Gallas, recently received a Hispanic Choice Award.  Who is Las Gallas? Tell us about your work with Las Gallas.

    Definition of a Galla:

    GALLA n. (proun. Ga-Ya)- The feminization of the word gallo which means rooster in Spanish (they should never be mistaken as chickens). The name explores female gender roles and labels. The name originated by the displaced roosters that survive in another land, climate and environment. This rare breed of highly creative fierce women can lay eggs, crow at the sun and moon and excel in all fields of the arts.

    LAS GALLAS is a Philadelphia-based multi-disciplinary artist collective which incorporate theatre, visual arts, dance, film, poetry, spoken word and literature imbedded in the tradition of community arts. I am one of the members along with Julia Lopez (writer, performance artist, educator) and Magda Martinez (playwright and poet).

    As artists involved in the visual, performing and literary arts we create using a “Let’s see what happens when we .” approach to our work. We create with one another sharing our skills that push our boundaries in our creative process. Utilizing our many artistic disciplines, creating with Las Gallas allows me to explore performance and literary arts practices. In return, I share with them visual art techniques and methods. In the end, we create new and original works that can be a theatre performance, literary reading, installation and/ or a visual art exhibit. As we celebrate our 10 years together this year, we continue to create through an organic process that allows for the development of true collaborations.


    What inspires you to be an artist by profession?

    When I was younger, I was told by others not to become an artist. In knowing the struggles that my family has had to overcome, I believed at an early age that I owe it to them to work hard and use my skills to my full potential. I knew when making the decision to pursue a career in the arts it would require me to work hard and be fully committed to my art.\

    My inspiration comes from the moments when a child realizes who they are, when a community sees the power and beauty that they possess, and when strangers breakdown assumptions and stereotypes of one another. Through the creative process I am able to expose others to the arts in an interactive non-traditional way. These moments reinforce the purpose of my work and my role as an artist working in communities.

     

    5.  In a society where artists and teachers are not often given the credit they deserve, what tools or resources have you used in order to distinguish yourself as a dedicated creative professional?

    Artists and educators play an important role in our society. When I train other artists through my residencies, I encourage them to see and recognize the value of their work, how it impacts the community and find ways to communicate and educate others of the work that they do. I have been able to share my methods and tools to give back to the artist community through my work as the Program Manager at the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation. Through the Bartol Foundation, I am able to help design and facilitate free professional training for artists working in communities. From building a strong curriculum to knowing how to market yourself as a teaching artists- these are tools that are necessary to know and use to have a sustainable career in the arts.


    6. What advice would you offer to young artists?

    I always share with young artists that I decided to create my first mural at age 17 when encountered with a racial incident in my high school. I felt powerless and angry and thought that the only power I had was to create a mural that counteracted that negative situation. With the support of my art teacher, I created a mural that celebrated cultural diversity in the school and discovered that I could create positive change through my art. My advice to young artists is to focus on your strengths as individuals and rely on the support of those that believe in you. Follow your path as an artist and continue to learn, discover, travel and create art work that is meaningful to you.

  5. Fleisher Teaching Artist Michelle Ortiz to speak at Moore Commencement! →

  6. Fleisher & The Community Design Collaborative →

  7. From the Annual Faculty Exhibition in 1979!

    From the Annual Faculty Exhibition in 1979!

  8. Tetsugo Hyakutake

    Tetsugo Hyakutake is a photographer and was a Wind Challenge artist in 2009-2010. Tetsugo has always made work about the historical, social, and economic issues about his homeland of Japan. After his Challenge Exhibition, Tetsugo moved back to Japan and is now making work about the tsunami and its effects on the culture.

    Check out this article on their work!

    http://www.philaphotoarts.org/silent-existence-by-tetsugo-hyakutake/

     

    Also, take 10 minutes to see this video! A super fantastic homemade arcade!

    http://cainesarcade.com/

    Finally,
    View Tetsugo’s Page on Fleisher’s Site

  9. The Community Design Collaborative recently filmed a short piece about all the ways in which we’ve received help from them over the past several years. You can watch the video here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ze1-HsK8SUs

  10. PNC & COLORWHEELS! →

  11.  Fleisher van: art classes on wheels
NEWSWORKSBy Peter Crimmins 

…
The 2011 Ford Transit van is outfitted with industrial racks that can deliver printmaking equipment, or a pottery wheel, or easels, or any artmaking practice to any outdoor public space. Its bright geometric color blocks is a vinyl wrap created by design students at Drexel University.

….

The van is designed to go to people who don’t go to Fleisher. Even though it has been at Catharine and 7th Streets for over 100 years, many South Philly residents hesitate to explore the arts education center.

"Sometimes it’s difficult for people who may live even with blocks of Fleisher to register for classes and make commitments and sign their kids up or sign themselves up," said Braun. "So people in the neighborhoods are asking us to be more available to them to bring what we have right to their doorsteps and playgrounds.
…

The van, called Color Wheels, was bought and tricked out with a $30,000 grant from PNC Bank’s “Arts Alive” project. In its new round of 2012 grants, PNC has just given another $35,000 for programming the van.

The people who staff the van need to know more than just art. They need to be trained in how to teach art in public spaces, to people with varying degrees of experience, cooperation, and attention span. They have to be prepared for disasters, great and small. At least three staffers will always be with the van when it is in public. 

….
The Fleisher van will make its public debut on Saturday, March 24, at the PNC Bank at 8th and Christian Streets. After that it is booked for four gigs until June, with more expected. It’s route will be focused on South Philadelphia neighborhoods first before heading out into other parts of Philadelphia
READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

    Fleisher van: art classes on wheels

    NEWSWORKS
    By Peter Crimmins

    The 2011 Ford Transit van is outfitted with industrial racks that can deliver printmaking equipment, or a pottery wheel, or easels, or any artmaking practice to any outdoor public space. Its bright geometric color blocks is a vinyl wrap created by design students at Drexel University.

    ….

    The van is designed to go to people who don’t go to Fleisher. Even though it has been at Catharine and 7th Streets for over 100 years, many South Philly residents hesitate to explore the arts education center.

    "Sometimes it’s difficult for people who may live even with blocks of Fleisher to register for classes and make commitments and sign their kids up or sign themselves up," said Braun. "So people in the neighborhoods are asking us to be more available to them to bring what we have right to their doorsteps and playgrounds.

    The van, called Color Wheels, was bought and tricked out with a $30,000 grant from PNC Bank’s “Arts Alive” project. In its new round of 2012 grants, PNC has just given another $35,000 for programming the van.

    The people who staff the van need to know more than just art. They need to be trained in how to teach art in public spaces, to people with varying degrees of experience, cooperation, and attention span. They have to be prepared for disasters, great and small. At least three staffers will always be with the van when it is in public. 

    ….

    The Fleisher van will make its public debut on Saturday, March 24, at the PNC Bank at 8th and Christian Streets. After that it is booked for four gigs until June, with more expected. It’s route will be focused on South Philadelphia neighborhoods first before heading out into other parts of Philadelphia

    READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

  12. I would like to invite you all to the opening of my show on Sunday April 1 (no Joke) Noon to 5:00pm at the Rosenfeld Gallery 113 Arch st. Philly (old city) PA. This will be my first major exhibition in Philadelphia and I will be showing with a fabulous painter Named Dale Roberts. Please feel free forward this email or invite anyone else you would like, the more the merrier!

    I would like to invite you all to the opening of my show on Sunday April 1 (no Joke) Noon to 5:00pm at the Rosenfeld Gallery 113 Arch st. Philly (old city) PA. This will be my first major exhibition in Philadelphia and I will be showing with a fabulous painter Named Dale Roberts. Please feel free forward this email or invite anyone else you would like, the more the merrier!